Maps Showing Inundation Depths, Ice-Rafted Erratics, and Sedimentary Facies of Late Pleistocene Missoula Flood in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

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Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Maps Showing Inundation Depths, Ice-Rafted Erratics, and Sedimentary Facies of Late Pleistocene Missoula Flood in the Willamette Valley, Oregon
Abstract:
This digital dataset, compiled from previously published and unpublished data sources, contains a personal geodatabase and raster data of features related to the repeated inundation of the Willamette Valley and Portland basin by Missoula Flood waters in Late Pleistocene time. The feature classes contained within the Will_Valley geodatabase are called 'erratics', representing the locations of ice-rafted erratics; 'contours', representing inundation levels associated with stratigraphic evidence of repeated floodings; and 'geology', representing the general distribution of Missoula Flood deposits. A stand-alone table within the geodatabase contains geologic unit descriptions for the geology polygons contained in the 'geology' feature class. Seven ESRI format raster grids are also included in this dataset that illustrate the physiography of the Willamette Valley as well as four important inundation levels. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:250,000 or smaller.
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Minervini, J.M., O'Connor, J.E., Wells, R.E., K. Wheeler (database editor), and E. E. Thoms (database editor), 2003, Maps Showing Inundation Depths, Ice-Rafted Erratics, and Sedimentary Facies of Late Pleistocene Missoula Flood in the Willamette Valley, Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 03-408, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -123.5
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -122.37
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 45.75
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 44.00
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Calendar_Date: 2003
    Currentness_Reference:
    publication date
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: map
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • Point (400)
      • String (4652)
      • G-polygon (171)
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
      Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
      UTM_Zone_Number: 10
      Transverse_Mercator:
      Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 0.9996
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -123
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0.0
      False_Easting: 500000
      False_Northing: 0.0
      Planar coordinates are encoded using coordinate pair
      Abscissae (x-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.01000
      Ordinates (y-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.01000
      Planar coordinates are specified in meters
      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1927.
      The ellipsoid used is Clarke 1866.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378206.400000.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/294.978698.
      Vertical_Coordinate_System_Definition:
      Altitude_System_Definition:
      Altitude_Datum_Name: National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929
      Altitude_Resolution: 0.000010
      Altitude_Distance_Units: meters
      Altitude_Encoding_Method:
      Explicit elevation coordinate included with horizontal coordinates
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    contours
    Lines representing flood inundation levels
    OBJECTID
    Internal feature number. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    Shape
    Feature geometry. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    CONTOUR
    Elevation in feet
    Range of values
    Minimum:115.0
    Maximum:400.0
    Units:feet
    Resolution:1
    Shape_Length
    Length of feature in meters (Source: ESRI)
    Range of values
    Minimum:0.705
    Maximum:2304825.9
    Units:meters
    erratics
    Points representing the locations of ice-rafted erratics
    OBJECTID
    Internal feature number. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    SHAPE
    Feature geometry. (Source: ESRI) Coordinates defining the features.
    Erratic_No
    Database ID number Textual identifier consisting of a name (for example "Allen" or the word "Erratic" followed by a number from 1 to 100)
    Source
    Original recorder
    ValueDefinition
    AllenJohn Eliot Allen (1986)
    Allison (fig)249 erratic locations were digitized from a map figure in I.S. Allison (1935), in which he indicates the Public Land Office Survey sections (2.6 sq. km; 1 sq. mi) that contain erratics . Consequently, the locations and elevations of these 249 glacial erratics are less well known than others in the database, may include duplicates of erratics described in other sources, and are symbolized by gray triangles on our maps.
    Allison(fig)249 erratic locations were digitized from a map figure in I.S. Allison (1935), in which he indicates the Public Land Office Survey sections (2.6 sq. km; 1 sq. mi) that contain erratics . Consequently, the locations and elevations of these 249 glacial erratics are less well known than others in the database, may include duplicates of erratics described in other sources, and are symbolized by gray triangles on our maps.
    Allison(table)I.S. Allison (1935) published a comprehensive study of Willamette Valley glacial erratics. Allison's original records are not available, but 42 locations of glacial erratics were located to the quarter- or half-section in his 1935 publication [ Source field of erratics feature class = Allison(table) E.T. 8/8/03]. These 42 locations were digitized using the elevation and Public Land Survey information published by Allison (1935).
    Beeson 
    BelaField sheets and notes from mapping completed by Jim Bela (Bela, 1981) in the late 70's and early 80's in the west-central Willamette Valley provided the locations of 16 erratics.
    Bretz, G. H. 
    Fillmore 
    Hodge 
    Hughes 
    McDowell 
    O'Connor 
    PiperArthur M. Piper cataloged field observations (mostly during 1928 and 1929) and literature citations of glacial erratics in the Willamette Valley and Portland basin in a series of 82 index cards and accompanying field maps archived at the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources office in Portland, Oregon. From these records, 54 erratic locations were documented.
    Treasher 
    WellsRay Wells
    Wozniak 
    Elevation
    Elevation of erratic in feet (stored as character text because some are expressed as ranges, with the low and high estimates separated by a hyphen).
    Range of values
    Minimum:32
    Maximum:827
    Units:feet
    Resolution:1
    Township
    Cadastral unit of the same name A one- or two-digit number followed by N or S
    Range
    Cadastral unit of the same name A one- or two-digit number followed by E or W
    Section
    Cadastral unit of the same name Generally an integer from 1 to 36, but "61" and "87" are used as well, and some contain a more precise location within the section, given by text such as "SW1/4SW1/4NE1/4 sec. 27"
    Lithology
    Rock type of erratic
    ValueDefinition
    andesite 
    andesite or granodiorite 
    argillite 
    basic ig. rocksbasic igneous rock
    biotite granite 
    biotite granodiorite 
    biotite hornblende granodiorite 
    biotite schist (?) 
    biotite schist, biotite grano gneissgrano probably refers to granodiorite
    biotite, hornblende, granodiorite 
    diorite 
    felsic? diabase? metavolcanic 
    gneiss 
    gneiss, qtziteqtzite = quartzite
    granite 
    granite and basalt 
    granite gneiss 
    granite or granodiorite 
    granite, basalt, granodiorite 
    granite, gabbro 
    granite, gneiss 
    granite, quartzite, porphyry 
    granite-gneiss with hornblende inclusions 
    granite/granodiorite/porph. rhyolite/quartzite 
    granitic 
    granitic and sandstone 
    granitic, sandstone 
    granitic? 
    granodiorite 
    granodiorite or granite 
    granodiorite w/ feldspar phenosphenos are phenocrysts, visible crystals
    granodiorite, bs, diabsebs probably refers to basalt; diabse is probably diabase
    iron-nickel meteorite 
    kyanite 
    Limestone, somewhat fluted, pitted by solution 
    metamorphic (phyllite?) 
    metasedimentary, metavolcanic 
    mostly granite 
    porph. biotite granodiorite schist 
    pyritic quartzite 
    qtz (?)quartz
    qtz schistqtz = quartz
    qtz. dioriteqtz = quartz
    quartzite 
    quartzite, granite/gneiss 
    quartzite, granitic 
    quartzitic and quartz 
    quartzose biotite hornblende(?) granodiorite 
    quartzose ig. or met. sed.quartz-bearing igneous or metasediment?
    several kinds 
    several kinds of rocks 
    slate 
    unknown 
    varied 
    xtal gabbro(?)xtal = crystalline?
    Comments
    Usually concerning the location quality descriptive text
    Location_Qual
    Quality of the location accuracy
    ValueDefinition
    fair 
    good 
    Date
    Date of original recording Date given as DD/MM/YY, DD/MM/YYYY, or YYYY. Question marks used for unknown parts. Leading zeros not included.
    Notes
    Description of the erratic descriptive text
    geology
    Polygons representing the distribution of Missoula Flood deposits
    OBJECTID
    Internal feature number. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    Shape
    Feature geometry. (Source: ESRI) Coordinates defining the features.
    Unit
    Geologic unit abbreviation
    Facies
    Fine or coarse-grained facies of flood deposits
    Shape_Length
    Length of feature in meters (Source: ESRI)
    Shape_Area
    Area of feature in meters (Source: ESRI)
    UnitDescription
    A table with geologic unit descriptions
    Unit
    Geologic unit abbreviation
    ValueDefinition
    QfcCoarse Missoula Flood deposits
    Qff1Younger and lower fine-grained Missoula Flood deposits
    Qff2Main body of fine-grained Missoula Flood deposits
    QaAlluvium and glacial-outburst flood sediment (Pleistocene)
    QlgLacustrine deposit, gravelly phase
    Facies
    Fine or coarse-grained facies deposit
    ValueDefinition
    coarsecoarse-grained deposit
    finefine-grained deposit
    Description
    Geologic unit description Textual description
    Source
    Publication source Bibliographic citation
    wv_elevation
    A 10 m digital elevation model of the Willamette Valley. Source for grids 0to115ft, 155to177ft, 177to260ft, and 260to400ft
    OBJECTID
    Internal feature number. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    Value
    Elevation in decimeters
    Range of values
    Minimum:0
    Maximum:13193
    Count
    Number of grid cells
    wv_hillshade
    A 10 m shaded relief image of the Willamette Valley
    OBJECTID
    Internal feature number. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    Value
    Value of gray on a scale of 1 to 100
    Count
    Number of grid cells
    wv_hydro
    A 20 m grid showing the hydrography of the Willamette Valley
    OBJECTID
    Internal feature number. (Source: ESRI) Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
    Value
    Arbitrarily assigned from previously released report OFR 01-294
    Count
    Number of grid cells

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • J.M. Minervini
    • J.E. O'Connor
    • R.E. Wells
    • K. Wheeler (database editor)
    • E. E. Thoms (database editor)
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    Karen Wheeler
    Pacific Northwest Urban Corridor Mapping Project, U.S. Geological Survey
    Geologist/GIS
    345 Middlefield Road, MS 973
    Menlo Park, CA
    USA

    650-329-4935 (voice)
    650-329-4936 (FAX)
    kwheeler@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

This database represents the most comprehensive compilation of Willamette Valley and Portland basin glacial erratic data to date. 400 records are contained herein, representing work from the 1920's to the present.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
    wv_elevation (source 1 of 8)
    Givler, R.W., and Wells, R.E., Shaded Relief and Color Shaded Relief Maps of the Willamette Valley, Oregon.

    Type_of_Source_Media: disc
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 24000
    Source_Contribution:
    Source 10m digital elevation model (DEM) that was used by Spatial Analyst for ArcGIS 8.3 to generate contour lines ('contours' feature class), a shaded relief grid (wv_hillshade), and inundation level grids (0to115ft, 115to177ft, 177to260ft, 260to400ft).
    Glacial Erratics in Willamette Valley (source 2 of 8)
    Allison, I.S., 1935, Glacial Erratics in Willamette Valley: Geological Society of American Bulletin v. 46, p. 675-722, Geological Society of America, Boulder, CO.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Erratic locations
    Geology of the Rickerall, Salem West, Monmouth, and Sidney 7.5 minute quadrangles - Marion, Polk, and Linn counties, Oregon (source 3 of 8)
    Bela, J.L., 1981, Geology of the Rickerall, Salem West, Monmouth, and Sidney 7.5 minute quadrangles - Marion, Polk, and Linn counties, Oregon: Geologic Map Series 18, Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Portland, OR.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 24000
    Source_Contribution: Erratic locations
    Cataclysms on the Columbia (source 4 of 8)
    Allen, J.E., Burns, M., and Sargent, S.C., 1986, Cataclysms on the Columbia: Timber Press, Portland, OR.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Contribution: Erratic locations
    Origin, extent, and thickness of Quaternary geologic units in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. (source 5 of 8)
    O'Connor, J.E., Sarna-Wojcicki, A., Wozniak, K.C., Polette, D.J., and Fleck, R.J., 2001, Origin, extent, and thickness of Quaternary geologic units in the Willamette Valley, Oregon.: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1620, 52 p., U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 25000
    Source_Contribution: Geologic units Qff1, Qff2, and Qfc south of latitude 45 deg 22'
    Geologic framework of the Willamette lowland aquifer system, Oregon and Washington (source 6 of 8)
    Gannett, M.W., and Caldwell, R.C., 1998, Geologic framework of the Willamette lowland aquifer system, Oregon and Washington: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1424-A, 32p., U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 250000
    Source_Contribution:
    Geologic unit Qs north of 45 deg 22'. Includes polygons now further divided by the addition of Trimble's Qlg (see next source citation).
    Geology of Portland, Oregon, and adjacent areas (source 7 of 8)
    Trimble, D.E., 1963, Geology of Portland, Oregon, and adjacent areas: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1119, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 62500
    Source_Contribution: Subdivision of Gannett and Caldwell's Qs unit into Qs and Qlg
    www.streamnet.org hydrography (source 8 of 8)
    www.streamnet.org, 2001, Compiled River Reach Stream coverages at 1:100,000 from USGS DLG coverages of Oregon.: www.streamnet.org hydrography data.

    Online Links:

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 100000
    Source_Contribution: Source of 20m grid of rivers (wv_hydro)
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 2003 (process 1 of 2)
    Dataset was compiled at 1:250,000 scale in ArcGIS 8.3. Features were imported from various digital sources and digitized from paper sources. Base elevation, shaded-relief, and hydrography grids were copied from previously generated grids. Flood inundation level grids were extracted from the elevation grid. Contour lines of 4 significant inundation elevations were generated from the elevation grid with the Spatial Analyst extension to ArcGIS 8.3. Data sources used in this process:
    • WillValley.mdb
    Date: 05-Aug-2003 (process 2 of 2)
    Creation of original metadata record Person who carried out this activity:
    Karen Wheeler
    Pacific Northwest Urban Corridor Mapping Project
    Geologist/GIS
    345 Middlefield Road, MS 973
    Menlo Park, CA
    USA

    650-329-4935 (voice)
    650-329-4936 (FAX)
    kwheeler@usgs.gov
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints:
Uses of this digital geologic map should not violate the spatial resolution of the data. Although the digital form of the data removes the constraint imposed by the scale of a paper map, the detail and accuracy inherent in map scale are also present in the digital data. The fact that this database was edited for a scale of 1:250,000 means that higher resolution information is not present in the dataset. Plotting at scales larger than 1:250,000 will not yield greater real detail, although it may reveal fine-scale irregularities below the intended resolution of the database. Similarly, where this database is used in combination with other data of higher resolution, the resolution of the combined output will be limited by the lower resolution of these data.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    USGS Western Earth Surface Processes Team
    345 Middlefield Road, MS 973
    Menlo Park, CA
    USA

    650-329-4935 (voice)
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  4. How can I download or order the data?

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 05-Feb-2016
Last Reviewed: 23-Jul-2004
Metadata author:
Peter N Schweitzer
USGS Midwest Area
Collection manager, USGS Geoscience Data Clearinghouse, http://geo-nsdi.er.usgs.gov/
Mail Stop 954
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
Reston, VA
USA

703-648-6533 (voice)
703-648-6252 (FAX)
pschweitzer@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geopsatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

This page is <https://geo-nsdi.er.usgs.gov/metadata/open-file/03-408/metadata.faq.html>
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