An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon

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What does this data set describe?

Title: An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon
Abstract:
This publication updates previous fault maps of Oregon as a contribution to the larger U.S. Geological Survey effort to produce digital maps of active faults in the Pacific Northwest region. The new map is derived from the 1992 fault map of Pezzopane, Nakata, and Weldon that has seen wide distribution and has been reproduced in essentially all subsequent compilations of active faults of Oregon. This publication provides a substantial update of known active or suspected active faults east of the Cascades. Improvements in the new map include (1) many newly recognized active faults, (2) a linked ArcInfo map and reference database, (3) more precise locations for previously recognized faults on shaded relief quadrangles generated from USGS 30-m digital elevations models (DEM), (4) more uniform coverage resulting in more consistent grouping of the ages of active faults, and (5) a new category of "possibly" active faults that share characteristics with known active faults, but have not been studied adequately to assess their activity. The distribution of active faults has not changed substantially from the original Pezzopane, Nakata and Weldon map. Most faults occur in the south-central Basin and Range tectonic province that is located in the backarc portion of the Cascadia subduction margin. These faults occur in zones consisting of numerous short faults with similar rates, ages, and styles of movement. Many active faults strongly correlate with the most active volcanic centers of Oregon, including Newberry Craters and Crater Lake.
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Weldon, Ray J. II, Fletcher, D.K., Weldon, E.M., Scharer, K.M., and McCrory, Patricia A., 2002, An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02-301.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -122.868134
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -116.886803
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 45.999989
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 41.998665
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Calendar_Date: 2002
    Currentness_Reference:
    publication date
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • Complete chain (3912)
      • Point (4)
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees. The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1983.
      The ellipsoid used is Geodetic Reference System 80.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.0.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257222.
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    orqfaults_dd.aat
    Fault traces shown on the map
    LENGTH_METERS
    Length of the fault trace in meters (floating-point value)
    Range of values
    Minimum:100.439
    Maximum:45952.850
    Units:meters
    Resolution:0.001
    FAULT_ID
    Integer identifier without further scientific significance
    Range of values
    Minimum:1
    Maximum:3913
    COMMENT
    Name of the fault, fault zone, or other explanation (text of at most 64 characters) Feature names or other explanatory text.
    REFERENCE
    Comma-separated list of integers identifying the bibliographic reference; a combination of any of the values described here
    ValueDefinition
    1Lineament across Quaternary unit from 1:100,000 shaded relief DEM.
    2Sherrod, D. R., and Pickthorn, L. G., 1992, Geologic map of the west half of the Klamath Falls 1¡ by 2¡ Quadrangle, south-central Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1282, scale 1:250,000.
    3Bacon, C. R., Mastin, L. G., Scott, K. M., and Nathenson, M., 1997, Volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake region, Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 97-487, 32 p., 1 sheet.
    4Klinger, R. E., Vetter U. R., and Ryter, D. W., 1996, Seismotectonic study for Gerber Dam, Klamath Project, California-Oregon: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Seismotectonic Report 96-1.
    5MacLeod, N. S., and Sherrod, D. R., 1992, Reconnaissance geologic map of the west half of the Crescent 1¡ by 2¡ Quadrangle, central Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-2215, 1 sheet, scale 1:250,000.
    6Hawkins, F. F., LaForge, R. C., and Gilbert, J. D., 1989, Seismotectonic study for Wickiup and Crane Prairie Dams, Deschutes Project, Oregon: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Seismotectonic Report 89-2.
    7Moring, B. C., 1983, Reconnaissance surficial geologic map of the Medford 1¡ by 2¡ Quadrangle, Oregon-California: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Studies Map MF-1528, 2 sheets, scale 1:125,000.
    8Walker, G. W., and MacLeod, N. S., 1991, Geologic map of Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Special Geologic Map, 2 sheets, scale 1:500,000.
    9Bacon, C. R., Lanphere, M. A., and Champion, D. E., 1999, Late Quaternary slip rate and seismic hazards of the West Klamath Lake fault zone near Crater Lake, Oregon Cascades: Geology, v. 27, p. 43-46.
    10Smith, J. G., 1988, Geologic map of the Pelican Butte Quadrangle, Klamath County, Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map GQ-1653, 1 sheet, scale 1:62,500.
    11Carver, G. A., 1972, Glacial geology of the Mountain Lakes Wilderness and adjacent parts of the Cascade Range, Oregon, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 75 p.
    12Ake, J. P., and Hawkins, F. F., 1999, Preliminary probabilistic ground motion evaluation, Crescent Lake Dam, Crescent Lake Project, Oregon: U.S. Department of Interior Technical Memorandum No. D8330-99-023.
    13Pezzopane, S. K., 1993, Active faults and earthquake ground motions in Oregon, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, 250 p.
    14Sherrod, D. R., 1991, Geologic map of a part of the Cascade Range between latitudes 43¡ - 44¡, central Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1891, 14 p., 1 sheet, scale 1:125,000.
    15Langridge, R. M., 1996, Unpublished map accompanying Langridge, R. M., Weldon, R. J., II, Pezzopane, S. K., and Jellinek, A. M., 1996, Active faulting and tufa formation: A possible kinematic link between Albert Rim and Viewpoint Faults: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 28, n. 5, p. 74.
    16Ryter, D. W., and Vetter, U. R., 1993, Seismotectonic Study for Haystack Dam, Deschutes Project, Oregon: Bureau of Reclamation Seismotectonic Report 93-1.
    17Wong, I. G., Dober, M., Hemphill-Haley, M. A., Naugler, W., and Silva, W. J., 1999, On probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and safety evaluation; earthquake ground motions, Bully Creek Dam, Vale Project, eastern Oregon: U.S. Department of Interior Technical Memorandum No. D8330-99-28.
    18Hawkins, F. F., Gilbert, J. D., and LaForge, R. C., 1989, Seismotectonic Study for Warm-Springs Dam - Vale Project and Owyhee Dam - Owyhee Project, Oregon: Bureau of Reclamation Seismotectonic Report 89-6.
    19Hawkins, F. F., LaForge, R. C., Templeton, M., and Gilbert, J. D., 1988, Seismotectonic study for Arthur R. Bowman and Ochoco Dams, Crooked River Project, Oregon: Bureau of Reclamation Seismotectonic Report 88-10.
    20Narwold, C. F., 1999, Late Quaternary faulting in the Quinn River Fault Zone, a soils investigation: Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip Guide, Pacific Cell.
    21Mimura, K., 1992, Reconnaissance geologic map of the west half of the Bend and the east half of the Shelvin Park 7.5' Quadrangles, Deschutes County, Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-2189, 1 sheet, scale 1:24,000.
    22Taylor, E. M., 1981, Central High Cascade roadside geology, in Johnston, D. A., and Donnelly-Nolan, J., eds., Guides to Some Volcanic Terrains in Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and Northern California: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 838, p. 55-83.
    23Hemphill-Haley, M. A., 1995, Unpublished data.
    24Hemphill-Haley, M. A., Page, W. D., Burke, R., and Carver, G. A., 1989, Holocene activity of the Alvord fault, Steens Mountain, southeastern Oregon: Final Report to the U.S. Geological Survey under Grant No. 14-08-0001-61333, 45 p.
    25Hemphill-Haley, M. A., 1987, Quaternary stratigraphy and late Holocene faulting along the base of the eastern escarpment of Steens Mountain, southeastern Oregon, M.A. thesis, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California, 87 p.
    26Lindberg, D. N., 1999, A synopsis of late Pleistocene shorelines and faulting, Tule Springs Rims to Mickey Basin, Alvord Desert, Harney County, Oregon.
    27Weldon, E. M., Unpublished air photo mapping of the Hot Springs fault, Summer Lake Basin.
    28Simpson, G. D., Hemphill-Haley, M. A., Wong, I. G., Bott, J. D., Silva, W. J., and Lettis, W.R., 1993, Seismotectonic evaluation, Burnt River Project-Unity Dam and Baker Project-Thief Valley Dam, northwestern Oregon: Final Report, prepared for U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.
    29Mann, G. M., and Meyer, G. E., 1993, Late Cenozoic structure and correlations to seismicity along the Olympic-Wallowa lineament, northwest United States: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 105, p. 853-871.
    30Vetter, U. R., 1998, Preliminary seismic hazard evaluation Mason Dam, Baker Project, Oregon, Technical Memorandum No. D8330-98-015, prepared for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado.
    31Wong, I. G., Dober, M., Hemphill-Haley, M.A., Naugler, W., and Silva, W. J., 1999, On probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and safety evaluation; earthquake ground motions, Bully Creek Dam, Vale Project, eastern Oregon: U.S. Department of Interior Technical Memorandum No. D8330-99-28.
    32Piety, L. A., LaForge, R. C., and Foley, L. L., 1990, Seismotectonic study for Cold Springs and McKay Dams, Umatilla Project, Oregon: Seismotectonic Report 90-1, prepared for U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado.
    33Geomatrix Consultants, 1990, Seismotectionic evaluation, Waco Dam site: Final Report, prepared for U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 115 p.
    34Minor, S. A., 1986, Stratigraphy and structure of the Western Trout Creek and Northern Bilk Creek Mountains, Harney County, Oregon and Humboldt County, Nevada, M.S. thesis, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.
    35Walker, G. W., 1973, Reconnaissance geologic map of the Pendleton Quadrangle, Oregon and Washington: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigation Map I-727, 1 sheet, scale 1:250,000.
    36Walker, G. W., Peterson, N. V., and Greene, R. C., 1967, Reconnaissance geologic map of the east half of the Crescent Quadrangle, Lake, Deschutes, and Crook Counties, Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Series Map I-493, 1 sheet, scale 1:250,000.
    37Weldon, R. J., II, Unpublished mapping.
    38Geomatrix Consultants, 1995, Seismic design mapping, State of Oregon: Final Report, prepared for Oregon Department of Transportation, 252 p.
    39Swanson, D. A., 1969, Reconnaissance geologic map of the east half of the Bend quadrangle, Crook, Wheeler, Jefferson, Wasco, and Deschutes Counties, Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Geologic Investigations Map I-568, scale 1:250,000.
    40Faults digitized from reference #36 that cut or bound Quaternary units.
    41Faults digitized from reference #36 that do not cut or bound Quaternary units, but are kinematically related to other active faults.
    42Faults drawn from DEM that do not cut or bound Quaternary units, but are kinematically related to other active faults.
    43Faults taken from digital Oregon State geologic map (digital version of reference #8) that bound or cut Quaternary units (little effort was made to check or redraw these faults).
    44Faults with numbered references on Personius, S. F., Dart, R. L., Bradley, Lee-Ann, and Haller, K. M., 2003, Map and data for Quaternary faults and folds in Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 03-095, 579 p., 1 sheet, scale 1:750,000 [numbered references are in our fault attribute table].
    45Faults digitized from the Oregon State map (reference #8) that cut a Quaternary (or possibly Quaternary) unit.
    46Faults digitized from the Oregon State map (reference #8) that bound a Quaternary (or possibly Quaternary) unit.
    47Clear continuation of a recognized active (or possibly active) fault.
    48Clearly part of a recognized active (or possibly active) fault zone.
    49May cut a Quaternary unit and appears to deflect a river course.
    50Has obvious geomorphic expression, but encounters no Quaternary units.
    51Has obvious geomorphic expression and kinematic relationship to other faults inferred to be active.
    52Possible buried fault, defined by aligned volcanic vents.
    53Same as reference #51, but trace taken from reference #8.
    ACTIVITY_CODE
    (integer)
    ValueDefinition
    1BLUE-Possibly active during the Quaternary
    3GREEN-Active during the Quaternary (<1.6 Ma)
    4YELLOW-Active during the middle to late Quaternary (<0.78 Ma)
    5ORANGE-Active during the latest Quaternary (<120,000 yrs)
    6RED-Active during the Holocene (<10,000 yrs) or post glacial (<18,000 yrs)
    DIP
    General direction of dip and character of fault (text 50 at most characters wide)
    ValueDefinition
    (no value) 
    N 
    DEX 
    E 
    N 
    N, Thrust 
    NE 
    NW 
    S 
    SE 
    SW 
    W 
    W, S 
    FAULT_SYMBOL
    description of symbolization on map plot (text, 50 characters wide)
    ValueDefinition
    blue 
    blue, inferred 
    green 
    orange 
    orange, approximately located 
    orange, concealed 
    red 
    red, approximately located 
    yellow 
    yellow, approximately located 
    yellow, concealed 

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • Ray J. Weldon II
    • D.K. Fletcher
    • E.M. Weldon
    • K.M. Scharer
    • Patricia A. McCrory
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    Ray J. Weldon II
    Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon
    Professor of Geology
    Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon
    Eugene, Oregon
    USA

    541-346-4584 (voice)
    541-346-4692 (FAX)
    ray@newberry.uoregon.edu
    Contact_Instructions:
    Secondary Contact:
    Patricia A. McCrory
    U.S. Geological Survey
    Research Geologist
    mailing address
    U.S.Geological Survey
    345 Middlefield Road
    Menlo Park
    California
    94025
    USA
    650-329-5677
    650-329-5163
    pmccrory@usgs.gov
    

Why was the data set created?

Update the active fault map and database for central and eastern Oregon as a contribution to the larger U.S. Geological Survey effort to produce digital maps of active faults in the Pacific Northwest region. The new map attempts to rectify a number of shortcomings in the original 1:500,000-scale map of Pezzopane (1993) and to add fault data acquired during subsequent investigations.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    Faults taken from the digital State Geologic map (digital version of ref#8) were copied from 1:500,000 coverage, all other fault traces were drawn onto 1:100,000 hill shade printouts of the DEM using 1:35,000 to 1:250,000 scale maps and air photos as reference.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    A literature search was undertaken to update the catalog of active faults in central and eastern Oregon. Those studies published in the past decade are listed in the references (see 'Read-Me' file) and in the ArcInfo database as attributes to the fault traces. The ArcInfo database is linked to the 1:100,000 map sheets where individual fault traces are keyed to the references that provide the line(s) of evidence for their assigned activity. To determine which faults were redrawn and which were simply compiled from a pre-existing digital database, one must also access the ArcInfo database, select the fault, and read its attributes.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints: none
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    U.S. Geological Survey Information Services
    Box 25286 Denver Federal Center
    Denver, CO
    USA

    303-202-4700 (voice)
    303-202-4693 (FAX)
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set? USGS Open-File Report 02-301
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides these geographic data "as is." The USGS makes no guarantee or warranty concerning the accuracy of information contained in the geographic data. The USGS further makes no warranties, either expressed or implied as to any other matter whatsoever, including, without limitation, the condition of the product, or its fitness for any particular purpose. The burden for determining fitness for use lies entirely with the user. Although these data have been processed successfully on computers at the USGS, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the USGS regarding the use of these data on any other system, nor does the fact of distribution constitute or imply any such warranty.
    In no event shall the USGS have any liability whatsoever for payment of any consequential, incidental, indirect, special, or tort damages of any kind, including, but not limited to, any loss of profits arising out of use of or reliance on the geographic data or arising out of the delivery, installation, operation, or support by USGS.
  4. How can I download or order the data?

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 05-Feb-2016
Last Reviewed: 26-Jul-2004
Metadata author:
Peter N Schweitzer
USGS Midwest Area
Collection manager, USGS Geoscience Data Clearinghouse, http://geo-nsdi.er.usgs.gov/
Mail Stop 954
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
Reston, VA
USA

703-648-6533 (voice)
703-648-6252 (FAX)
pschweitzer@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

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