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Digital map of major bedrock lithologic units for the Pacific Northwest: a contribution to the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project

Metadata also available as - [Outline] - [Parseable text] - [XML]

Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Digital map of major bedrock lithologic units for the Pacific Northwest: a contribution to the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project
Abstract:
This report is one in a series of digital maps, data files, and reports generated by the US Geological Survey to provide geologic process and mineral resource information for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project (ICBEMP), a US Forst Service and Bureau of Land Management interagency project. The various digital maps and data files which were provided by the USGS, and which are available in this and other reports, are being used in a GIS-based ecosystem assessment which includes a comprehensive analysis of past, present, and future ecosystem conditions within the general area of the Columbia River Basin east of the Cascade Mountains.
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    Johnson, Bruce R., and Raines, Gary L., 1995, Digital map of major bedrock lithologic units for the Pacific Northwest: a contribution to the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 95-680.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -124.5
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -108.0
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 49.0
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 39.0

  3. What does it look like?

    http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1995/of95-680/lithmp.pdf (PDF)
    4 megabyte PDF representation of major bedrock lithologic units for the Pacific Northwest.

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Calendar_Date: 1995
    Currentness_Reference: publication date

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: map

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      This is a vector data set.

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      The map projection used is Albers Conical Equal Area.

      Projection parameters:
      Standard_Parallel: 43.0
      Standard_Parallel: 48.0
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -117.0
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 41.0
      False_Easting: 0
      False_Northing: 700000

      Planar coordinates are encoded using coordinate pair
      Planar coordinates are specified in meters

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    LITHM.PAT
    Geologic map units (Source: OFR-95-0680)

    LITHOLOGY
    Map unit lithology (Source: OFR-95-0680)

    ValueDefinition
    AlluviumUnconsolidated sediment (clay, silt, sand, gravel). Includes glacial outwash deposits.
    Dune sandWind deposited sand
    LoessWindblown silt deposits
    Lake sedimentsLake sediments and playa deposits
    LandslideLandslide deposits
    Glacial driftMaterial deposited by glacial processes. Includes till and moraine (unstratified) as well as outwash (stratified).
    Shale and mudstoneFine-grained sedimentary rock derived from clay
    Argillite and slateFine-grained metamorphic rock formed from shale
    TuffVolcanic ash. Includes minor amounts of detrital sediment.
    SiltstoneFine-grained detrital sedimentary rock derived from silt
    Meta-siltstoneFine-grained metamorphic rock formed from siltstone
    SandstoneMedium-grained detrital sedimentary rock derived from sand
    Meta-sandstoneMedium-grained metamorphic rock formed from sandstone
    QuartziteMedium-grained metamorphic rock formed from quartz-rich sandstone.
    ConglomerateCoarse-grained detrital sedimentary rock derived from gravel. Locally includes angular-fragment breccia.
    Meta-conglomerateCoarse-grained metamorphic rock formed from conglomerate
    CarbonateSedimentary rock, mostly composed of limestone and dolomite, locally metamorphosed to marble.
    Mixed miogeosynclinal rocksMixed sequences of miogeosynclinal sedimentary rocks. Includes interlayered shale, siltstone, lithic sandstone, quartzite, and conglomerate.
    Mixed eugeosynclinal rocksMixed sequences of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks having abundant dark rock fragments and mafic minerals. Includes interlayered shale, siltstone, greywacke, conglomerate, and melange with subordinate mafic volcanic rock, chert, and calcareous rock.
    Phyllite and schistMeta-sedimentary phyllite and schist. Fine-grained metamorphic rocks derived from shale, mudstone, and siltstone.
    Interlayered meta-sedimentFine-to coarse-grained metamorphic rocks derived from clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks
    Carbonate and shaleMixed sequences of carbonate rock and shale with subordinate sandstone and conglomerate
    Meta-carbonate and shaleMixed sequences of metamorphosed carbonate rock and shale with subordinate sandstone and conglomerate
    Felsic pyroclasticsRhyolitic pyroclastic rocks
    Felsic volcanic flowsRhyolitic volcanic flows
    Calc-alkaline meta-volcanicsCalc-alkaline suite of meta-volcanic rocks
    Calc-alkaline volcanic rocksCalc-alkaline suite of pyroclastic rocks and volcanic flows. Generally andesite to quartz-latite.
    Mafic pyroclasticsBasaltic pyroclastic rocks
    Mafic volcanic flowsBasaltic volcanic flows
    GreenstoneMafic meta-volcanic rocks. Includes subordinate spillite, slate, argillite, and greywacke.
    GraniteIncludes intrusive rhyolitic rocks
    Alkalic bodiesAlkalic intrusive bodies
    Calc-alkaline intrusive rocksCalc-alkaline suite of intrusive rocks. Generally granodiorite to diorite.
    Mafic intrusive rocksGenerally dioritic or gabbroic
    Ultramafic rocksIncludes associated gabbroic rocks
    Mixed granitic gneissDominantly granitic gneiss, migmatite, augen gneiss, and hornblende gneiss. Includes subordinate anorthosite, amphibolite, calc-silicate gneiss, schist, marble, and quartzite.
    Mafic schist and greenstoneDark-colored, fine-grained, foliated, mafic metamorphic rocks. Mostly metamorphosed basaltic to dioritic rocks.
    Mafic gneissDark-colored, medium- to coarse-grained, layered metamorphic rocks. Includes amphibolite.
    unclassifiedUnknown map units
    open waterareas of water

    LITHIM.PAT
    Geologic map units at specific locations (same attributes as polygon coverage LITHIM.PAT) (Source: OFR-95-0680)

    STATE-INT.PAT
    State boundaries (Source: OFR-95-0680)

    ST
    State abbreviation (Source: OFR-95-0680)

    ValueDefinition
    CACalifornia
    COColorado
    IDIdaho
    MTMontana
    NVNevada
    OROregon
    UTUtah
    WAWashington
    WYWyoming


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

    This product would not exist without the input of the many geoscientists whose work was essential to making both state geologic maps and mineral resources databases. This effort would not be possible without those past products and others from the following agencies: the US Geological Survey, the California Division of Mines and Geology, the Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology, the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, the Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, the Geological Survey of Wyoming, and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.
    USGS geologists, Thor Kiilsgaard and Fred Miller, provided useful advice about regional geology and the identification of unlabeled features on the published state geologic maps. Art Bookstrom, Steve Box, Jim Evans, Tom Frost, and Michael Zientek, USGS geologists, contributed to the development of the major lithology classification scheme and to the classification of individual bedrock units for the map.
    We particularly acknowledge Patrick Geehan, the Bureau of Land Management project coordinator for the Interior Columbia River Basin Ecosystem Management Project, for recognizing the importance of geology to ecosystem management and for supplying funds to digitize the Washington, Idaho, and Montana state geologic maps.

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Johnson, Bruce R
    USGS-GEO-ERG-MRS
    Mail Stop 954, USGS
    12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
    Reston, VA 20192
    US

    703-648-6051 (voice)
    bjohnson@usgs.gov


Why was the data set created?

The goal of the ICBEMP management strategy is to provide management tools to sustain or restore ecosystem integrity and produce desired condistions, uses, products, values, and services over the long term. The intent of the project is to understand the ramifications of management practices or distrubances both in the area subject to the practice or disturbance as well as effects which may be removed, in time and space, from the area.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    Jennings (1977) (source 1 of 9)
    Jennings, C.W., 1977, Geologic map of California: California Division of Mines and Geology Map No. 2.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 750000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of California

    Bond and Wood (1978) (source 2 of 9)
    Bond, J.G., and Wood, C.H., 1978, Geologic map of Idaho: Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Mines and Geology.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Idaho

    Ross, Andres, and Witkind (1955) (source 3 of 9)
    Ross, C.P., Andres, D.A., and Witkind, I.J., 1955, Geologic map of Montana: U.S. Geological Survey.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Montana

    Stewart and Carlson (1978) (source 4 of 9)
    Stewart, J.H., and Carlson, J.E., 1978, Geologic map of Nevada: U.S. Geological Survey.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Nevada

    Walker and MacLeod (1991) (source 5 of 9)
    Walker, G.W., and MacLeod, N.S., 1991, Geologic map of Oregon: U.S. Geological Survey.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Oregon

    Hintze (1980) (source 6 of 9)
    Hintze, L.F., 1980, Geologic map of Utah: Utah Geological and Mineral Survey.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Utah

    Hunting and others (1961) (source 7 of 9)
    Hunting, M.T., Bennet, W.A., Livingston, V.E., and Moen, W.S., 1961, Geologic map of Washington: Washington Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Washington

    Love and Christiansen (1985) (source 8 of 9)
    Love, J.D., and Christiansen, Ann Coe, 1985, Geologic map of Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey.

    Type_of_Source_Media: paper
    Source_Scale_Denominator: 500000
    Source_Contribution: Source of geologic information of Wyoming

    Johnson and Raines (1995) (source 9 of 9)
    Johnson, B.R., and Raines, G.L., 1995, Digital map of major lithologic bedrock units for the Pacific Northwest: a contribution to the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 95-680.

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Contribution: Composite geologic map of the Pacific Northwest

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: unknown (process 1 of 2)
    The state geologic maps were processed digitally, as follows: the source material was scanned, the lines and polygons were edited and proofed, attributes were added and proofed, the maps were transformed from scanner units to geographic coordinates, and finally, map distortions were removed by rubber-sheeting.

    Date: 24-Aug-2000 (process 2 of 2)
    Creation of original metadata record

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Jennifer Lenz
    U.S. Geological Survey
    12201 Surise Valley Drive, Mail Stop 918
    Reston, VA 20192
    USA

    703-648-6974 (voice)
    703-648-6560 (FAX)
    pschweitzer@usgs.gov

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    Complete

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    The starting points for the major bedrock lithologic map and other derivative maps were the geologic maps of California (Jennings, 1977), Idaho (Bond and Wood, 1978), Montana (Ross, Andress and Witkind, 1955), Nevada (Stewart and Carlson, 1978), Oregon (Walker and MacLeod, 1991), Utah (Hintze, 1980), Washington (Hunting and others, 1961), and Wyoming (Love and Christiansen, 1985).


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints: None

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Cindy Dean
    Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project
    112 E. Poplar Street
    Walla Walla, WA 99362
    USA

    (509) 522-4030 (voice)

  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 95-680

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with US Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for desciptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 31-Jul-2014
Metadata author:
Peter N Schweitzer
USGS Midwest Area
Geologist
Mail Stop 954
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
Reston, VA 20192-0002
USA

703-648-6533 (voice)
703-648-6252 (FAX)
pschweitzer@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)


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